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The Kodak Corporation was organized by George Eastman who invented the dry, transparent, and flexible photographic film used by the Kodak Cameras in 1888.

That year, Kodak introduced the first pre-loaded camera with film for 100 pictures. The camera was handheld and very light. After shooting, the user would take the camera with the film still inside to get it developed. The technician would then install new film.

On April 26, 1976, one of history's largest patent suits was filed against Kodak by the Polaroid Corporation. The plaintiff revealed that 12 Polaroid patents were being violated by Kodak. On October 11, 1985, the courts found Kodak in violation of seven of the patents, leaving Kodak consumers with useless cameras and nowhere to develop the film. The company did, however, offer reimbursement for the useless cameras.

After the incident, the company employed many full-time research scientists to perfect, transparent film and it was first proven in Thomas Edison’s motion picture camera in 1891.